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Help & Economics – What’s in it for me?

Helping others is one of the most fundamental actions and a satisfying emotion for humans. Our whole civilization is built on it – all around the world. Mankind is linked, as if by a long invisible chain. Some of the links are seen between the mother and the child, the teacher and the student, the doctor and the patient, between friends etc. A mother feeding her child is an obvious link. A patient is linked to the doctor, yet not linked until we fall sick. As friends and colleagues, we work/play as a team and the invisible linkages help us accomplish goals.

Helping can be split into 3 basic types:

  1. Informal help: This is the most common of all and doesn’t have any obligation whatsoever. It is more of our altruistic behaviour in daily life. Helping a child carry his bag, helping someone cross a busy street, carrying or picking up something that your colleague dropped, tying the shoelace for your child or passing the dish on the dining table etc.
  2. Semi-formal: The best example is asking and providing advice, buying a car or a home, taking a job, car servicing or changing tyres for a fee etc.
  3. Formal help: Legal help from a lawyer, medical help from a doctor, tutor teaching children in a school or at home and books are a form of formal help.

More often than not we need informal help in our day – to – day lives.

“Informal help” shapes our life and how we behave with others. In fact, even while we seek formal help there is quite a bit of informal help added to the “formal help” to make it convenient to the receiver. However, it is often the informal help that makes a difference to our lives. So, can we agree informal help is what makes the human clock tick?

Let’s look at the economic angle – We don’t like to admit to ourselves, but we know that our social relationships revolve around the simple mantra “If you scratch my back, I’ll scratch yours”. The nature of give and take can be seen as transactional. Human relations are a lot like economics, even when we are helping each other. The way it mirrors the logic can also be understood by certain common expressions. We “pay” respect, we “pay” attention. We say “the move paid – off” when something goes well. Ideas get “sold” when convincing others. To me that is all economics! What is it to you?

Although it seems counter intuitive “helping” resembles an economic exchange. If you help a poor man on the street, you expect a grateful nod as an acknowledgement. That reassures you that you are a good person for acting so charitably. To understand how helping relationships work we need to acknowledge the reciprocal dynamics of human society. This dynamics makes life easier when giving or receiving help!

Economics is deeply embedded into our lives. We expect to have equitable social interactions or a fair exchange of thoughts. We expect people to listen carefully and take us seriously.

Back to the invisible links – Why do the links so often go wrong? Why do children desert their old parents? Why do patients sue doctors? Why do people get stuck in legalese while helping others in a road accident? Why are colleagues at workplace fraught with tension? This is despite “helping” to be so intrinsic to our society.

In my opinion – we don’t make the economics work. We don’t acknowledge or pay the “help” it’s due. The links exist. We break them when we start ignoring the economics.

Acknowledge your help! Pay back generously. Strengthen the links. You will see that our community will be far stronger and livelier, than what it is now.

One Response to “Help & Economics – What’s in it for me?”

  1.  Srilata

    Excellent sir! the article is so motivating,it help us to reflect on our day to day actions

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Help & Economics – What’s in it for me?

Helping others is one of the most fundamental actions and a satisfying emotion for humans. Our whole civilization is built on it – all around the world. Mankind is linked, as if by a long invisible chain. Some of the links are seen between the mother and the child, the teacher and the student, the doctor and the patient, between friends etc. A mother feeding her child is an obvious link. A patient is linked to the doctor, yet not linked until we fall sick. As friends and colleagues, we work/play as a team and the invisible linkages help us accomplish goals.

Helping can be split into 3 basic types:

  1. Informal help: This is the most common of all and doesn’t have any obligation whatsoever. It is more of our altruistic behaviour in daily life. Helping a child carry his bag, helping someone cross a busy street, carrying or picking up something that your colleague dropped, tying the shoelace for your child or passing the dish on the dining table etc.
  2. Semi-formal: The best example is asking and providing advice, buying a car or a home, taking a job, car servicing or changing tyres for a fee etc.
  3. Formal help: Legal help from a lawyer, medical help from a doctor, tutor teaching children in a school or at home and books are a form of formal help.

More often than not we need informal help in our day – to – day lives.

“Informal help” shapes our life and how we behave with others. In fact, even while we seek formal help there is quite a bit of informal help added to the “formal help” to make it convenient to the receiver. However, it is often the informal help that makes a difference to our lives. So, can we agree informal help is what makes the human clock tick?

Let’s look at the economic angle – We don’t like to admit to ourselves, but we know that our social relationships revolve around the simple mantra “If you scratch my back, I’ll scratch yours”. The nature of give and take can be seen as transactional. Human relations are a lot like economics, even when we are helping each other. The way it mirrors the logic can also be understood by certain common expressions. We “pay” respect, we “pay” attention. We say “the move paid – off” when something goes well. Ideas get “sold” when convincing others. To me that is all economics! What is it to you?

Although it seems counter intuitive “helping” resembles an economic exchange. If you help a poor man on the street, you expect a grateful nod as an acknowledgement. That reassures you that you are a good person for acting so charitably. To understand how helping relationships work we need to acknowledge the reciprocal dynamics of human society. This dynamics makes life easier when giving or receiving help!

Economics is deeply embedded into our lives. We expect to have equitable social interactions or a fair exchange of thoughts. We expect people to listen carefully and take us seriously.

Back to the invisible links – Why do the links so often go wrong? Why do children desert their old parents? Why do patients sue doctors? Why do people get stuck in legalese while helping others in a road accident? Why are colleagues at workplace fraught with tension? This is despite “helping” to be so intrinsic to our society.

In my opinion – we don’t make the economics work. We don’t acknowledge or pay the “help” it’s due. The links exist. We break them when we start ignoring the economics.

Acknowledge your help! Pay back generously. Strengthen the links. You will see that our community will be far stronger and livelier, than what it is now.

One Response to “Help & Economics – What’s in it for me?”

  1.  Srilata

    Excellent sir! the article is so motivating,it help us to reflect on our day to day actions

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Tatva’s Talisman – ICP

As someone rightly said ‘Coaching done well may be the most effective intervention designed for human performance’…. and we at Tatva proved it, when we got our first chance.

This article shares the recent success story of our school “Tatva Global School” and how the ICP (Intensive Coaching Program) brought out the best from each of the students to scale heights that they never imagined they could.

The programme at Tatva, designed by our Academic Director and the Principal was a great success. Students were able to perform to the best of their abilities and pass out with flying colors in their maiden tryst with the Board Exams. Moreover, the whole ICP programme was designed to be completed during school hours which was a herculean task, but the team managed it efficiently. Kudos to the team!

I personally believe that examination results are an outcome of our learning. However, we can step-up the intensity of practice to perform better in an exam. This need not be extra learning in a short period but extra practice to write faster or memorize important points to build answers, etc.

The specific ICP at TATVA was designed for only two months and only for the board going classes to do the following:

  • To enable the student to understand how the exam pattern would test them
  • To use their time wisely during examinations
  • To plan and launch a determined assault on all the topics systematically, to ensure that no stone remained unturned and nothing came as a surprise in the final exams.
  • A day schedule was designed something like a day in the life of the student for those two months.
  • Teachers follow up morning and evening on sticking to the plan and not deviate i.e. creating focus.
  • Enough time for breaks were incorporated to let children play and de-stress themselves, rejuvenate and galvanize themselves between focused sessions.

For this programme to work the teachers had to:

  1. believe that the programme would work
  2. have excellent content knowledge
  3. prepare, design and create assignments / question papers etc; which tested the child in all possible methods
  4. have the enthusiasm to go the extra mile
  5. be able to identify the specific topic wise focus for each child.

What I liked most about it was that mature adults designed the program and did not just tell students to study well. The ICP did not cause any stress as some people tend to think and advocate. (It definitely could lead to that if the teachers who implement it do not know how to go about it, though…)

It is my strong opinion that ICP helps the child gain confidence to appear for the ultimate test of skill and endurance. The knowledge was acquired throughout the year in a learning relaxed environment for 8 months. ICP turbo-charged the last two months for performance to scale the summit.

I also collected some thoughts of the students who successfully scaled the summit…

Sonakshi: “One of the most important aspects of board preparation is hard work, and I believe there is no substitute for this. I put in the required effort in the last two months before my board exams. The ICP programme at Tatva taught me how to study smart and earn my scores”

Vanshika: “My success motto is always to believe in myself, be focused and most importantly hard work in the right direction. The support provided by my teachers and parents has helped me. The Tatva ICP Programme has really helped me out in realizing my potential and to work on the important aspects and also the importance of perseverance and discipline in life.”

Jessica: “It is the relentless hardwork put in by my teachers and me in this journey that gave the wings to my success”

Jasnavi: “It is the confidence of my teachers in my ability, that helped me win. I just followed the instructions of the teachers blindly”

Yes….Teachers can make a difference!!!!

Pavani Dokka

Teacher of Grade X- English

Tatva Global School

 

 

21 Responses to “Tatva’s Talisman – ICP”

  1.  Archana Gaba

    Truely said and beautifully expressed.We really need to document our efforts and innovations so that others can learn from our experiences.Congrats and kudos Pavani.

     
  2. Good to know that Tatva has a Tatva for success.
    All the best

     
  3.  Harika

    Congratulations ma’am
    Super

     
  4.  D Chandrima

    Can’t agree more about the importance of coaching where continuing to learn is the constant thing at every stages in life. keep up the excellent work Tatva Global teachers and management.

    Teachers can make a difference is an understatement. A more apt of saying is that Teachers can make a transformation. Pavani you are already doing it.

    My best wishes.

     
  5. Viswanath Sivaswamy

    Congratulations to you and the team of teachers…

     
  6.  Anuradha Sundar

    Congratulations to you and your team of teachers Pavani !!

  7.  Reeya

    Congratulations Ma’am❤️

     
     Reeya
  8. Congratulations Ma’am. ❤️

  9.  Reeya

    You are doing a great job, Ma’am❤️

  10.  Reeya Agarwal

    Congratulations Ma’am❤️

     
  11.  Henry Jacob Rosario

    A great job executed to perfection. Your dedicated efforts paid off. Congratulations to everyone who made this possible.

  12. How can make a huge difference in the lives of students. It is indeed a pleasure to see you writing so well . You have a flair for it. god bless you.

     
  13.  Shobha

    Wow…great to hear about the efforts put by educators and the school …👏🏻👏🏻👏🏻

     
  14.  Nidhi

    A dream does not become a reality by magic… it is the sweat, determination and hard work that realises it.

    Kudos to the children I believing in their teachers and teachers in believing in their students – it’s the partnership that has made the dreams come true!!

    Congratulations to each and everyone !!!

     
  15.  Sahitya

    It shows that a proper plan and hard work always lead us towards success. Great team work. Congratulations ma’am.

     
  16.  Priya

    Congratulations ma’am.

     
  17.  Pranav

    Very nice article, ma’am

     
  18.  Keerthana Alladi

    Having written the Board exams myself, I know the importance of last two months in the exam preparation. Hard work and dedication are the key. But getting the right support and direction from the teachers is icing on the cake. Congratulations Pavani ma’am, you’re doing an amazing job 🤩

     
  19.  Keerthana Alladi

    Having written the Board exams myself, I know the importance of last two months of preparation. Hard work and dedication are the key. But getting the right support and direction from the teachers is icing on the cake. Congratulations Pavani ma’am you’re doing an amazing job 🤩

     
  20.  Neha Peter

    Beautifully penned article. I know for a fact that the reason I was able to do well in my board exams was because of my teachers; and the reason I love English literature is because of the impact you had on me.
    Thank you so much Pavani ma’am for your support and guidance and congratulations to your team for their success.
    All the best for the future!

     
  21.  Sudhakar Tati

    Since the Inception, Tatva has grown to be one of best schools and the beauty is keeping intact the values that they have promised during start of the school. Board exams were the first Litmus test both for Tatva students and the teachers equally and I believe both of them have exceeded expectations.
    Congratulations to the Students and Teachers who have made this possible.
    As a parent, I am always proud to be associated with Tatva.

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Working with teenagers – How good are we as teachers?

“Adolescence is a new birth, for the higher and more completely human traits are now born.”

– G. Stanley Hall
Living a teacher is definitely not easy, yet it is fun-filled. Who wants to live an easy life, if there isn’t fun enough? While students are unique, and their learning varies by age, teaching adolescents is a different ball game. There is a lot more that a teacher has to do with adolescents i.e. the teens. To a teenager student, the teacher has to be a confidante, a mentor, a guide, a counsellor and sometimes, a bit of disciplinarian. It is a complex balance of roles, akin to walking a tight rope without a harness.

As we all know, teenage is that crucial period when children go through a major physical and emotional changes. They deal with unexpected questions and are always under constant pressure of being accepted by others.  They yearn respect and recognition. They find themselves at crossroads where they are sometimes treated as kids, and sometimes as grown-ups – as per the convenience of others (adults) around them. Add to this the advent of social media like Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. It just is too much of posturing that they do to be “accepted”.

A teacher has this huge responsibility of being a role model, someone that his/her students can look up to. The teacher could set examples and guide the teenager. For example, it is fine to disagree with friends, especially when it isn’t just. However, it is important to be tolerant and accept diverse thoughts from friends and peers. It is also important to make the teenagers realize that pursuing a dream is more important to life. In that process trying to make everyone happy may not be possible and that it isn’t their fault. Teenagers should also be told that it’s okay to feel bad and cry over some things. Crying is not gender specific. As long as they take a stand i.e. standup for all the right causes and to do things keeping the human values intact, it is ok to be just being themselves and not try to be someone they aren’t. This is a crucial period for a teacher too, who, at times, in an effort to be friendly and popular among the teens could forget to see the thin line that exists between being a friend of a student and being a friendly teacher to a student.

Teenagers these days have many friends – real and virtual. The virtual friends cause more harm and since they are unseen, it is sometimes hard to believe them. Yet, teenagers want to emulate the new-found virtual friend. Teacher being the confidante can divert the student away from what seems fun, yet fraught with risk.  A teen student needs a guide, mentor and a ‘Teacher’ – one who listens, understands, values and respects them. And, while doing so watches their back and corrects them and helps before they fall. We can be a friendly teacher, but let’s remember that we are teachers and not friends. If you become the friend, who’ll play the teacher?

 

 

One Response to “Working with teenagers – How good are we as teachers?”

  1. Yes, I do agree that teacher’s job is not an easy task. Nice blog!!!

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A Teacher’s Heartfelt words to children

14th of November every year, we celebrate Children’s day in our country, with pomp and show. Schools have programs for children. Newspapers flash news and print articles about children and their activities. Politicians too, spend this day with children. But why confine this celebration to just that one day? In my opinion, every single day is children’s day. We, the teachers exist, because you the children exist.

We have families and friends just like anyone else. But our entire life as teachers, is woven around you. We are happy when you are happy; we feel sad, when you are sad. We feel proud at your achievements as if they are our own; we feel as disappointed as you, when you do not reach your goals. We keep your schedules in mind while we plan our work and leisure.

At times, we might use words that sound harsh, only to correct your mistakes. Remember one thing though, we do it because we want you to learn from your mistakes. We want you to overcome your weaknesses, build on your strength and move on in life – as strong, confident and brave global citizens – because that is what we have nurtured you to be. No matter what, we love you with all our heart and soul – unconditionally.

You spend your childhood with us in a school. We bond well, as a teacher and student should. We give you the skills, the values and set examples so that you learn to differentiate between the good and the bad. We want you to make the right choices. We always do our best to help you, to become a better person. We desire that you grow up into a wonderful human being – one with a golden heart, a clean soul and be helpful to the society, in which you live.

We will always long to be with you – in your thoughts. Whenever you need a guide in life, think of us. The time that you spend with us in school, the values that you imbibe here, will impact the decisions that you will make in life and the laurels that you will win in future. Take risks in life, don’t be afraid of failures – we have prepared you for that as well.

Know that when you grow up and want to look back and meet us – you will always be welcomed with the same warmth and love – because for us teachers, you will always remain our children and every single day is children’s day.

 

 

 

 

8 Responses to “A Teacher’s Heartfelt words to children”

  1.  VISWANATH Sivaswamy

    Very Nice article…

     
  2.  Sudhakar Tati

    Well Articulated.. and Heartening.. Madam.. You should be child in Heart.. to Understand and Nurture kids 🙂

     
  3.  Satyashri

    Wow ma’am

    Wow ma’am, well articulated.

     
  4.    Dipawali

    Your Article shows As a Teacher you are Excellent..to nurture and understands kids..👍👍👌

     
  5.  Pooja

    Well written, Sudeshna.

     
  6.  Pooja

    Well written, Sudeshna…

     
  7.  Shilpi

    हार्दिक बधाई! बहुत ही उम्दा लेख..

     
  8. Nicely written!!! I agree every day should be children’s day.

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 Teacher of the New Millenium

Teaching in modern times is a remarkably intricate, multifaceted skill, and there is never a sense of having “mastered” it. It’s a process of learning throughout. While this could be an intimidating idea, it’s actually one of the most energizing and exciting things about the profession. It is also a thankless and a sleepless job. It is all about making others better as a result of your presence and making sure that impact lasts in your absence.

This is a fact that cannot be brushed aside. A majority of the change- a positive change in society comes from schools. A school sets the vision and teachers have the knowledge and the necessary tools along with a will to innovate inside a school. Teachers put ideas into practice and exercise a hidden power to influence children.

The school is the medium through which teachers can bring about a monumental change in the social fabric of the young in our society. Also consider the current problems caused by Double-Income-Parents, nuclear families, apartment living, doling out to children leading them to think they are entitled etc. These complex issues change the role of a teacher from just “knowledge giver” to a “character builder”.

Role of a multifaceted modern day school teacher:

Today’s teacher is someone who plays multiple roles in the lives of children at school.

  • She guides children to learn “How to Learn” – not just deliver her knowledge
  • Invokes the spirit of learning, to question and to have belief in oneself.
  • She extends a helping hand to help children navigate difficult situations at home, with friends etc;
  • Lends a shoulder to cry on and be the hand that applies the healing touch.
  • Be the guiding force to propel children to raise the bar when it matters and come up with a stupendous performance.
  • Be the parent who helps the social and emotional development in a child.

Current day teachers generally complain about the time they have to invest in this process. Not all managements are helpful in realizing the challenges and making curriculums which can address these issues. Management and parents also can be too focused on ranks and grades. I believe a good school will invest in the teachers and also in systems that include

  • Annual plans and Lesson Plans that make the classes more structured
  • Use different media to express like bulletin boards, charts etc
  • Time for notebook and paper corrections and the analysis that follows
  • Devise various club and extra-curricular activities that help children be team players
  • Provide for bus facilities to teachers which increases interaction with children during the bus trips
  • Teacher training and development – teachers should invest personal time and managements will invest money.

The objective is to ensure that the teacher is always engaged with children. Almost to a point that he/she has no time to breathe (pun intended). These are all opportunities for a teaching process, intertwined with each other. Teaching becomes a wholesome process, guiding students at every step and ensuring that they are cared for in all aspects when in school or even when outside school.

Teachers should have a vision on how they would like to see their ideas and aims take shape as a final product. They may not be sure of the path to take to reach the goal but should be very sure about what they would like to achieve as their final objective.

Modern day teaching can make a huge difference to society as students carry with them the torch for our future based on the overall development at school. These students can then influence more than one life at the same time. And this can be a harbinger of the new society that would emerge from all this churning.

As someone rightly said “I’m not a teacher, but an awakener”. A teacher affects eternity, the impact of which lasts for posterity. Finally I would like to conclude with Albert Einstein’s words. “It is the supreme art of the teacher to awaken joy in creative expression and knowledge.”

 

Pavani Dokka

English -HOD

TATVA Global School

 

 

 

4 Responses to “Teacher of the New Millenium”

  1.  Ginu John

    Great very good article

     
  2.  Muralikrishna Ch

    Well, written, should have covered little more on team building, missing contribution by parents, augmented learning at school, learning initiative as projects outside curriculum.

    Teachers contribute effectively in psychological build of a student, ignites the thinking and transforms a mere mortal to an ambassador for future.

     
  3.  Pooja

    We’ll put, Pavani. Keep it up….

     
  4.  Chandrima Ganguly Dendukuri

    Very well written Pavani. Can’t agree more that good teaching is a wholesome process., Very inteicate and intertwined with a child’s learning needs and as well personality development needs . Individual attention to each student is a blessing and transforms the child from a caterpillar to a butterfly. It is overwhelming for me to think how a teacher repeats this process with innovation and customization, to all the students, she teaches.

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SCHOOL PRINCIPAL FOR THE NEW MILLENIUM

There are about 18,000 CBSE affiliated schools and several other State and ICSE schools in India. It is estimated CBSE schools will grow by about 10% every year. That will be a 10 percent increase in the employment of educational administrators of all types, specifically Principals. This doesn’t consider the retiring principals, which I estimate to be less in number as we don’t have a specific retirement age for Principals.

As the need for school leadership increases, the pool of qualified candidates will be a challenge for India, both in urban and rural districts. We have a need to train and make available such leadership in quick time. This document is an overview of what effective leadership is all about.

School founders have to answer three fundamental questions:

  • What kind of educational institutions are we building in this ever changing landscape
  • What leaders do we need to manage and navigate this change?
  • Where do we find them? or How do we prepare principals to lead?

This document considers solutions to these questions. These solutions are expected to to result in new standards of school organization, addressing a shift in the role and responsibility of a Principal together with developing relationships between principals and various functions of a school.

  • The new kind of educational institutions are catering to an urban, nuclear population. The current day parents are mostly double-income-parents. They are also nuclear families. Sometimes these parents are single. Such domestic situations cause different challenges for a school.

Schools in the new millennium cannot restrict their domain to only the “cognitive” areas. They contribute largely to the “Affective” (emotional development) by using the school community.  The role of a school is now well beyond classes and lessons. It is now (w)holistic development of a child. There was a significant contribution from the student’s family until early 1990’s. That support is now fast diminishing.

To meet this new change in the society – a school and Principal have to plan well and execute plans. Plans are made for almost all areas including annual calendars, academic planners, extra-curricular calendar, competitive test participation etc. The Principal is expected to foresee and gather her team to deliver precisely to the calendar.

  • What kind of educational leaders do we need?

Schools are looking for leaders. We need highly competent principals who promote success for all students by

  1. facilitating the development, articulation, implementation, and stewardship of a vision of learning that is shared and supported by the school community;
  2. advocating, nurturing, and sustaining a school culture and instructional program conducive to students of the new millennium
  3. ensuring management of the academic organization, academic operations and resources for a safe, efficient, and effective learning environment;
  4. collaborating with functions that include transport, security and general administration
  5. partnering with families and community members, responding to diverse community interests and needs, and mobilizing community resources;
  6. acting with integrity, fairness, and in an ethical manner;
  7. understanding, responding to, and influencing the larger political, social, economic, legal, and cultural context.

As a country India is changing at a rapid pace. There are new expectations being set and new standards that are developed all around us. These standards will create a shift in roles, responsibilities, and relationships between the constituents that influence a school and the Principals. To meet these new expectations, we must re-imagine leadership. We must abandon the centrist, one-person taking charge tradition that prevails in our schools today. Our vision must focus on “we” rather than “me”.

Principals must spin webs that are connected through relationships rather than power. For all this to happen, we need collective leadership- a leadership that supports relationships. This could chaos But will definitely promote adaptability.

  • Where do we find our new Principals?

School cultures have to value collective leadership and provide opportunities for teachers to become leaders. Every school has a culture of its own and a curriculum it believes in. These are derived from the vision the founders set. New leadership takes time to fathom these practices as the enter laterally into a school. Therefore it is best suited for a school to develop leaders from within.

However this is easier said than done. In the past it was usually the eldest on the team who dons the mantle of a leader. This may not work anymore. Schools have to breakup their structures into layers and help teachers learn different skills at different levels. Administrative skills are acquired by experience. Decision making roles, at several levels, have to be created to enable teachers to be trained within the system. These structures also help Principal develop a “we” culture than a “me” culture.

As the teachers navigate through these structure leaders will emerge. They are usually outspoken, involved and believe in the school culture, participative, loyal and above all they are passionate about the vision and practices that the school sets for itself. Only years of experience or expertise in teaching a subject will not suffice anymore. The new leader has to be capable of all the things mentioned in section-(2) above.

I believe that we can do this as a community and as a country. Principals and school managements have to take the lead. Teachers have to be forthcoming to adapt. Parents have to be educated about these. Together we can build the leaders for our schools.

 

Shailaja Reddy

Principal

TATVA Global School.   

 

 

 

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